Courses

An interdisciplinary examination of the objects, structures, technologies and environments humans create and use. Compares approaches from anthropology, archaeology, folklore, history, vernacular architecture, and cultural landscape studies. Introduces students to material culture study methods, emphasizing techniques of identifying, recording, analyzing and interpreting a wide range of material culture categories.

This is an applied research course designed to link theory, field research, data collection, and service learning in the local community. This will include research design, data collection and analysis, and final report preparation and presentation. Other topics covered include historic overview of the development of applied anthropology, the uses and roles of anthropology outside academia, survey of professional practice including ethical considerations, state of the job market, techniques for career preparation, and issues of generalization versus specialization.

A field school designed to help students develop their ethnographic field work skills, especially rapid appraisal techniques in an applied setting. Students will learn how to design and carry out a research project utilizing such skills as participant observation, interviewing, and data analysis. Students will be required to write a report based on their research and experiences. Contact department for more information. May be repeated for credit.

Application of methods and procedures used in the investigation of communication in natural contexts. Topics include research ethics, problem formation, research design, basic data gathering techniques and strategies (with an emphasis on linguistic approaches), quantitative and qualitative data analysis and report writing.

May be repeated for credit if topic differs.

The focus of the seminar may vary, but the class will comprehensively address the four goals of the anthropology major -- comparative perspective, four-field coverage, integration of the four field approach, and ethical awareness -- through discussion of areas of special interest to the department faculty. Project and activities will be designed that will require students to demonstrate their mastery of curricular goals as outlined in the department's assessment program. Majors are strongly encouraged to enroll during their final fall semester prior to graduation.

During the first week of the semester, students interested in special studies in anthropology must submit a written proposal and an outline of projected work to a faculty sponsor for approval. Each unit of credit requires a minimum of 45 hours of work per semester (3 hours per unit per week), including regular consultation with an evaluation by the faculty member in charge.

Students in the internship program have an opportunity to apply anthropological theory and methods to a variety of situations in public and private agencies. Internships require faculty approval and a minimum of 45 hours of work per unit per semester, including regular consultation with the faculty sponsor. This internship is usually overseen by supervisors in off-campus agencies who report to faculty supervisors. Cr/NC only. May be repeated for credit.

Students will team with staff of SSU's Anthropological Studies Center to perform, for example, pre-field research, recognize and record archaeological sites, use GPS equipment, make computer-generated maps, and complete state record forms. Activities will vary depending on available projects. Internships require a minimum of 45 hours of work per semester/unit, including regular consultation with faculty sponsor. Cr/NC only.

Students in the internship program have an opportunity to apply anthropological theory and methods to a variety of situations in public and private agencies. Internships require faculty approval, a minimum of 45 hours of work per unit per semester, including regular consultation with and evaluation by the faculty sponsor. Cr/NC only. May be repeated for credit.

Pages